International Women’s Day and Celebrating Women’s Achievements

In the words of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, women belong in all places where decisions are being made. As we celebrate International Women’s Day, we look to the women who paved the path for an inclusive and equitable future.

International Women’s Day (IWD) has been observed globally since the early 1900’s and celebrates the social, economic, cultural, and political achievements of women. According to the IWD website, this year’s theme is #ChooseToChallenge, and women around the world are invited to call out gender bias and celebrate women’s achievements. We asked our team for women they admire who have made a difference in building a more gender equal world.

Whitney Wolfe Herd, CEO, Bumble

Founder of the social dating app launched in 2014, Herd took Bumble public and earned her reputation as the youngest female self-made billionaire. Previously at Tinder, she recognized that tech culture is toxic to women and started Bumble, where women call the shots on how connections get made and developed.

Why we like her: We admire Herd’s ability to lead her company with a values-based and mission-first focus and commitment to working towards the goal of recalibrating gender norms.

Queen Elizabeth

Queen Elizabeth II has ruled for longer than any other Monarch in British history and is one of the most admired people on earth. Despite a lifestyle steeped in tradition, Queen Elizabeth is a progressive thinker who has embraced technology from the first televised coronation to having her own Instagram account.

Why we like her: Queen Elizabeth came to the throne at age 26 and continues to evolve in her role. She succeeded in what is typically a male dominated role, proving that women are equally capable.

Barbara Smoot, President, WELD

Barb Smoot is the President & CEO of Women for Economic and Leadership Development (WELD), an organization that develops and advances women’s leadership to strengthen the economic prosperity of the communities it serves. She is active in the Columbus, OH community and dedicates her time to advancing women’s leadership in the community.

Why we like her: We’ve heard Barb talk about how the collective power of women can move mountains, and we believe! She is a strong leader, gives back to her community and inspires others.

Dr. Amy Acton

Dr. Acton is a physician who served as the first woman director of the Ohio Department of Health at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Acton has been called “Ohio’s trusted face during the pandemic” and was an important member of the governor’s decision-making team. Dr. Acton has spent her career as a champion for those most vulnerable.

Why we like her: Dr. Acton has spent her career helping others and is not afraid to use her voice. We love that she believes in the power of data and is a strong leader in the face of crisis.

Judy Blume, Author

New Jersey native Judy Blume influenced a generation of readers with essential novels for young women such as “Are You There God? It’s Me Margaret.” She is an advocate of intellectual freedom whose books broke barriers with tales of adolescence and the female experience. In addition to being an activist against censorship, Blume is the founder of the charitable foundation The Kids Fund.

Why we like her: Judy Blume’s books are about real young women, their adolescent experience, and cover diverse topics. Her characters are often imperfect, unsure, and maybe a little awkward – similar to how many of us were as teenagers.

Olabisi Boyle, Vice President, Hyudai

Boyle is the vice president of product and mobility at Hyundai, guiding the strategic direction of Hyundai’s vehicle lineup and leads their mobility strategy, which includes connected car technology and future innovations. She is a trained engineer, receiving a masters from Columbia University, and has worked in typically male-dominated industries such as manufacturing and automotive.

Why we like her: Boyle is a strong face for the evolving technology industry, one that is inclusive and diverse. She is an advocate for ensuring that women and people of color feel a sense of belonging in all roles and industries. We couldn’t agree more!

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In the words of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, women belong in all places where decisions are being made. As we celebrate International Women’s Day, we look to the women who paved the path for an inclusive and equitable future.

International Women’s Day (IWD) has been observed globally since the early 1900’s and celebrates the social, economic, cultural, and political achievements of women. According to the IWD website, this year’s theme is #ChooseToChallenge, and women around the world are invited to call out gender bias and celebrate women’s achievements. We asked our team for women they admire who have made a difference in building a more gender equal world.

Whitney Wolfe Herd, CEO, Bumble

Founder of the social dating app launched in 2014, Herd took Bumble public and earned her reputation as the youngest female self-made billionaire. Previously at Tinder, she recognized that tech culture is toxic to women and started Bumble, where women call the shots on how connections get made and developed.

Why we like her: We admire Herd’s ability to lead her company with a values-based and mission-first focus and commitment to working towards the goal of recalibrating gender norms.

Queen Elizabeth

Queen Elizabeth II has ruled for longer than any other Monarch in British history and is one of the most admired people on earth. Despite a lifestyle steeped in tradition, Queen Elizabeth is a progressive thinker who has embraced technology from the first televised coronation to having her own Instagram account.

Why we like her: Queen Elizabeth came to the throne at age 26 and continues to evolve in her role. She succeeded in what is typically a male dominated role, proving that women are equally capable.

Barbara Smoot, President, WELD

Barb Smoot is the President & CEO of Women for Economic and Leadership Development (WELD), an organization that develops and advances women’s leadership to strengthen the economic prosperity of the communities it serves. She is active in the Columbus, OH community and dedicates her time to advancing women’s leadership in the community.

Why we like her: We’ve heard Barb talk about how the collective power of women can move mountains, and we believe! She is a strong leader, gives back to her community and inspires others.

Dr. Amy Acton

Dr. Acton is a physician who served as the first woman director of the Ohio Department of Health at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Acton has been called “Ohio’s trusted face during the pandemic” and was an important member of the governor’s decision-making team. Dr. Acton has spent her career as a champion for those most vulnerable.

Why we like her: Dr. Acton has spent her career helping others and is not afraid to use her voice. We love that she believes in the power of data and is a strong leader in the face of crisis.

Judy Blume, Author

New Jersey native Judy Blume influenced a generation of readers with essential novels for young women such as “Are You There God? It’s Me Margaret.” She is an advocate of intellectual freedom whose books broke barriers with tales of adolescence and the female experience. In addition to being an activist against censorship, Blume is the founder of the charitable foundation The Kids Fund.

Why we like her: Judy Blume’s books are about real young women, their adolescent experience, and cover diverse topics. Her characters are often imperfect, unsure, and maybe a little awkward – similar to how many of us were as teenagers.

Olabisi Boyle, Vice President, Hyudai

Boyle is the vice president of product and mobility at Hyundai, guiding the strategic direction of Hyundai’s vehicle lineup and leads their mobility strategy, which includes connected car technology and future innovations. She is a trained engineer, receiving a masters from Columbia University, and has worked in typically male-dominated industries such as manufacturing and automotive.

Why we like her: Boyle is a strong face for the evolving technology industry, one that is inclusive and diverse. She is an advocate for ensuring that women and people of color feel a sense of belonging in all roles and industries. We couldn’t agree more!